About Siemreap

Siem Reap (Khmer: ក្រុងសៀមរាប) is the capital city of Siem Reap Province in northwestern Cambodia, and is the gateway to Angkor region.
Siem Reap has colonial and Chinese-style architecture in the Old French Quarter, and around the Old Market. In the city, there are traditional Apsara dance performances, craft shops, silk farms, rice-paddy countryside, fishing villages and a bird sanctuary near the Tonle Sap Lake.
Siem Reap today, being a popular tourist destination, has a large number of hotels and restaurants. Most smaller establishments are concentrated around the Old Market area, while more expensive hotels are located between Siem Reap-Angkor International Airport and the town along National Road 6. There are a variety of mid-range hotels and restaurants along Sivatha boulevard, and mid budget to mid-range hotels in the Phsar Leu area.

Sisophon, Battambang & Angkor Wat received by King Sisowath, 1907.
The name Siem Reap means the 'Flat Defeat of Siam' — today’s Thailand — and refers to the centuries-old conflict between the Siamese and Khmer peoples.
This name was baptized by King Ang Chan (1516-1566) as “Siem Reap”, meaning “the flat defeat of Siam” (Cambodians call Siam or Thailand “Siem”). It was because of the victory over the Thais which King Ang Chan counter-attacked, and shot Prince Ong dead on an elephant’s back, and routed the Thais and captured no less than 10,000 Thai troops.
The history was recorded that King Ang Chan of Cambodia tried to assert further independence against Thailand. The Thais also had been through internal trouble themselves during these years. King Prajai was poisoned by his wife, Queen Sri-Sudachan, who committed adultery with a commoner, Worawongsa, while he was on the campaign against Chiang Mai. The Queen then raised Woravongsa to the throne. The nobles hated Woravongsa, who was a commoner, and lured the usurper and his family to a place outside the city where he was assassinated together with Queen Sri-Sudachan and a new-born daughter during the royal family’s procession by barge to see a white elephant (allegedly just captured). The nobles then invited Prince Tienraja, who was a monk in a monastery, to disrobe and ascend the throne under the title of King Maha Chakrapat (1548-1569). Being informed of the internal troubles in Ayudhaya, King Ang Chan attacked Prachin in 1549 and successfully took away Thai inhabitants. At Prachin, he obtained information that King Maha Chakrapat had become the new king of Ayudhaya, signaling that the question of succession in Ayudhaya had thus become settled. King Ang Chan therefore retreated and did not advance any further. King Maha Chakrapat was very angry at this, but his hands were tied, because the Burmese had just come by the way of the Three Pagoda Pass, took Karnchanaburi and Suparnburi, and appeared in front of Ayudhaya.
Cambodian history presents the reason for the next Thai attack because King Ang Chan refused to give King Maha Chakrapat a white elephant when he asked for it, it is indicated that King Ang Chan declined any symbol of vassalage to Thailand. King Maha Chakrapat’s attention was now turned towards Cambodia. He put Prince Ong, the Governor of Sawankaloke and Srey’s son, in charge of an expedition against Cambodia. King Ang Chan counter-attacked, and shot Prince Ong dead on an elephant’s back, and routed the Thais and captured no less than 10,000 Thai troops. It was because of this victory over the Thais that King Ang Chan baptized that battle area as “Siem Reap” meaning “the flate defeat of Siam”.

Climate data for Siem Reap

Month

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

 

Average high °C (°F)

32.0
(89.6)

33.3
(91.9)

34.6
(94.3)

35.5
(95.9)

35.2
(95.4)

33.5
(92.3)

32.7
(90.9)

32.0
(89.6)

32.2
(90.0)

31.3
(88.3)

30.6
(87.1)

31.0
(87.8)


Average low °C (°F)

19.7
(67.5)

20.8
(69.4)

26.1
(79.0)

25.1
(77.2)

25.4
(77.7)

24.8
(76.6)

24.8
(76.6)

25.0
(77.0)

24.5
(76.1)

23.9
(75.0)

22.4
(72.3)

20.3
(68.5)


Precipitation mm (inches)

0.7
(0.028)

3.5
(0.138)

28.0
(1.102)

61.2
(2.409)

175.9
(6.925)

221.3
(8.713)

236.6
(9.315)

151.0
(5.945)

276.1
(10.87)

248.0
(9.764)

81.7
(3.217)

10.1
(0.398)


Source: worldweather.org

 

 

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